Daily Archives: August 13, 2008

66a Church Road, Simon Callow – A Festival Dickens

THEATRE
66a Church Road
4 stars ****
Traverse Theatre (Venue 15)
Simon Callow – A Festival Dickens
4 stars ****
Assembly Rooms (Venue 3)

ONE OF THE JOYS of Daniel Kitson is that he is – in his life and work – a living, breathing refutation of the big lie that serious theatre and comedy on the Edinburgh Fringe are enemies, rather than complementary branches of the same art-form.  From a dazzling start just six years ago as a 25-year-old winner of the Perrier Award, Kitson has matured into a writer of superb dramatic monologues about the state of our nation and our hearts in the early 21st century; and an unobtrusively brilliant and commanding performer of them, too.

66a Church Road is described, by Kitson, as a “break-up show” for the flat in Crystal Palace where he lived for six years, but which he felt he had to leave when his repeated attempts to buy the place from his cultural thug of a landlord finally failed.  What Kitson has to say about our complex remembered relationship with the places we live is obvious enough, although beautifully captured in a set which features piles of suitcases full of tiny model “memories” of the flat in its heyday; and this brand-new monologue is not yet quite as perfectly shaped and trimmed as last year’s compilation-tape show, C-90.

Where Kitson really hits his stride, though, is in his brilliant understanding of how our dealings with the property market bring us into contact with our cash-based civilisation at its most crass, greedy, reductive and soul-destroying.   On the surface, this is a play about Daniel Kitson and his flat.  But at its heart, it’s about the relationship between a good man in search of a kindly and fulfilling life, and a society that often seems to have lost all sense of beauty, humanity, craftsmanship, quality and love.  And when that theme fires his writing with the fierce, lyrical anger that is Kitson’s hallmark, what emerges not only makes us laugh; but also speaks for the part of all of us that struggles to stay human, in a harshly commercialised world.

Like Kitson, Charles Dickens was a great champion of humanity in what seemed like heartless times; and it’s hard not to be struck by the similiarity of mood – compassion, anger, love, humour – that links Kitson’s style with that of the great observer of human greed, absurdity, kindness and eccentricity in the England of the 1840’s.  Simon Callow’s 100-minute Festival Dickens – playing at the Assembly Rooms – offers two superb long monologues, based on the stories of Mr. Chops, the dwarf who wins the lottery, and Dr. Marigold the cheap-jack, a good man who makes his living by selling goods off the back of a cart.  The show represents no great stretch for an actor of Callow’s quality; he takes the stage, he dons the wigs, he understands the language, and he gives the stories to us with great generosity, in the grand old-fashioned style.

But the quality of the writing is simply breathtaking, in its vividness, its inventiveness, its sheer imaginative power; and it reveals Dickens as a writer with a sympathetic imagination strong enough to break the bonds of his own time, and to show a real passion for the equal worth and value of each human life that is rare even today, in a 21st century world supposedly founded on those values.

Joyce McMillan
66a Church Road until  24 August,  Simon Callow until 25 August.
pp. 231, 231.

ENDS ENDS

The Inconvenient Truths

THEATRE
The Inconvenient Truths
4 stars ****
Rocket @ Roxburghe Hotel (Venue 211)

THERE’S PLENTY OF THEATRE made by young people at the Fringe; most of it receives less attention than it deserves, and some of it is obviously aims to educate the performers as much as to delight the audience.   Here’s a school, show, though – from the Denver School of the Arts in Colorado – that pulls off the rare achievement of bringing 40 young people aged between 14 and 17 on stage, showing off some impressive performing skills, and offering the audience a truly substantial and moving glimpse into the mind of the generation now trembling on the cusp of adulthood.

Over a brisk 70 minutes, director Shawn Hann’s young cast move through about 20 sketches based on  “inconvenient truths”, drawing their title from Al Gore’s famous documentary about global warming, but using the concept to explore personal as well as planetary unease.  They are, they remind us, the generation who were in third grade when the planes slammed into the World Trade Center; since mid-childhood, they have lived in a world which they describe as being shaped by a new and all-encompassing fear, first of nameless terrorism, then of catastrophic climate change

On top of that, they have to deal with all the normal pains of adolesence, from broken friendships to unrequited love; their 3-minute Puberty-The Musical is a joy.  And the girls have to live  with a culture in which body-image and physical perfection have become a lethal obsession; they handle it brilliantly, by ripping off the cling-film in which they’ve wrapped themselves, and screaming their heads off in a shriek of anger and liberation.  It’s a young people’s sketch show, and it can’t quite escape that bitty, episodic feel.   But the content is terrific, the staging excellent, and the quality of performance truly moving; and if these magnificent, funny, angry, humble, self-aware kids speak for the whole of their generation, then it’s hard not to feel that there’s some hope for the future, after all.

Joyce McMillan
Until 15 August
p. 206

ENDS ENDS