Monthly Archives: April 2016

Ring Road

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JOYCE MCMILLAN on RING ROAD at Oran Mor, Glasgow, for the Scotsman, 9.4.16.
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4 stars ****

IF THE PLAY were a situation comedy, the scene would be about as familiar as they come. Lisa and her brother-in-law Mark, who have always liked each other, have sneaked away to an unromantic hotel on a ring-road, to spend an illicit couple of hours together; and the atmosphere of nervous anticipation, as they look around the room, is exactly what we would expect.

The situation is not quite what it seems, though, in this latest Play, Pie and Pint drama by actress and playwright Anita Vettesse; and the genre is not comedy but quiet contemporary tragedy, as a tale unfolds of lives that have lost their joy, and of people who – unable to find the courage to start all over again – are trying to patch things up as best they can, and simply trying to bear the damage that results.

The play, in other words, is quite painfully true to life; and although elements of the sex comedy survive – and are cheerfully carried throughout by Martin Donaghy as Mark – it’s the underlying grief and desperation of Lisa’s situation that burns itself onto the mind, in a terrific performance by Angela Darcy. And there’s also a bonus, in the form of an unseen voice-over performance from Robbie Jack as Lisa’s absent husband, Paul, each of his mobile phone calls more poignant than the last. It’s a short play, in other words, but one that contains a little slice of the real music of humanity; and just a couple of years into her writing career, Anita Vettesse is proving herself a playwright well worth watching.

Oran Mor, Glasgow, today; and the Traverse Theatre, Edinburgh, Tuesday-Saturday next week.

ENDS ENDS

Lost At Sea

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JOYCE MCMILLAN on LOST AT SEA at Summerhall, Edinburgh, for the Scotsman, 9.4.16.
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3 stars ***

THERE’S BEEN A REAL feast of children’s theatre associated with this year’s Edinburgh International Science Festival; and one of this week’s highlights was Catherine Wheels’ Lost At Sea, a vivid short show about our oceans – and about the big currents that surge through them – from one of Scotland’s leading children’s theatre companies.

Written by Morna Pearson, Lost At Sea is inspired by the true story of 7,200 plastic ducks that spilled from a giant container ship in the Pacific Ocean in 1992, and, over many years, gradually found their way around the world. On a giant floor map (by designer Karen Tennant) that shows the five huge ocean “gyres” circulating water, weather, and – increasingly – plastic rubbish around the planet, the play tells the matching stories of a girl in Harris, and a boy whose life takes him from Australia to Alaska and Hawaii; both love the sea, and their lives are strangely linked by the story of the ducks, which he experiences directly when he start to find dozens of them on a beach in Alaska.

At just 50 minutes, Lost At Sea seems almost too short to deal with the many issues it raises, from loss and bereavement to marine pollution and the fascinating world of oceanography; the awkward jump-cuts in the story seem a little exposed, the ending too abrupt. But performers Ashley Smith and Laurie Brown make a delightful job of bringing the story to life; and it would be a fine thing if a slightly longer, richer version of Lost At Sea were to have a further life, now that its Science Festival run is over.

Run completed.

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